With a not-so-warm welcome to the year, by all accounts, the start of the 2020 decade has been an unpleasant rocky rollercoaster ride; the type of rollercoaster your friends force you to go on, while you sheepishly wait in silence in the lineup imagining what it will be like to ride the beast of burden. Queasiness set in, you start to question whether those two hot dogs you ate earlier might make an inconvenient reappearance shortly. There is no debate this year so far has conveyed a similar story to that of this symbolic rollercoaster, whether it be from war, wildfires, politics, or the pandemic.

The Covid-19 illness, which was about to embark upon its devastating journey, gripping the world with only destruction on its mind. Initially believed to be nothing but a string of pneumonia cases in Wuhan, the true nature of the deadly illness was not yet realized. However, reality did finally set in, and most of us have now come to terms with Covid-19’s infectiously deadly and destructive nature. The world is approaching nearly 700,000 deaths, with over 16.5 million infections worldwide, and things seem like they may get worse before they get better.

Canada has weathered this pandemic relatively well compared to other nations; however, death or loss of loved ones will always hit us in the soft spot of our hearts.  As per the Government of Canada public health website, to date over 8,900 Canadians have died from Covid-19, and with 115,000 infections so far, the threat to Canadians is very real. Prior to 2020, these people were innocently going about their lives, and suddenly death was unavoidably thrust upon them. These people were hospitalized and killed by an illness which, without permission, entered their mouth or nose and took control of their body in a march towards death.

If Covid-19 presents just one lesson for the average Canadian to learn; it is that life is precious, and death can be unexpected. If we may be so unlucky to be innocently subjected to death from illness or disease, we can at the very least take proper measures now to ensure our families are financially protected if we unexpectedly die. Covid-19 devastation has been a wake-up call to many Canadians that death is sudden and all consuming, with many searching out life insurance, to make sure coverage is in place before it is too late. Life insurance financially protects your family when you die, no matter the cause, and in an uncertain world it is more important that ever to consider buying life insurance now.

The realty is that deadly illness is more prevalent today. The likelihood of future pandemics is a very real threat, and for better or for worse, humanity has now been changed forever. After the pandemic began and social interactions restricted, Canadian life insurers reacted by offering pragmatic solutions. Life insurers almost immediately removed most testing requirements to get a policy approved, and for certain ages insurers removed the need for medicals tests entirely. Also, insurers increased the amount of coverage one can apply for without a medical test. Finally, Canadian life insurers maintained that Canadians could apply for coverage completely non face to face, the process can be completed contact free.

Now, remember that the pendulum swings both ways, and where there is give there will usually take. This evolving threat to human life from pandemics could also signify the beginning of a more restrictive life insurance industry. This is not the case right now, and any death is covered by life insurance. Nevertheless, it does not mean that in the future life insurance companies could look to restricting coverage from certain deaths. It is reasonable to assume that the life insurance industry will look at what has happened from Covid-19, what could happen in future pandemics, and make changes to the coverage they offer in the future. Rather than risk it, buy coverage now and guarantee your term insurance or whole life insurance while you can, and before it is too late. Truly, because of this pandemic, life insurance offered in Ontario, B.C., and all other Canadian regions has become more accessible than ever before.

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